Friday, April 27, 2012

darling, it's death

Tonight we continue our survey of this stack of pulp fiction, jumping ahead to the sixth entry in the Richard S. Prather / Shell Scott series (at least according to the Wikipedia page linked above), Darling, It's Death.


Cover by Barye Phillips


Sadly, I have no more information to share about the cover artist than I did in our last entry but interested parties can check out an alternate Barye cover here; an alternate alternate Barye cover here; a Robert McGinnis cover here; and, while we're at it, a kitschy foreign edition here.

(And as always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

bodies in bedlam

Tonight's entry, the second in our stroll through this stack of Richard S. Prather paperbacks, is Bodies In Bedlam; also the second entry in the Shell Scott series, as well as the second in this series (but not the last) to feature cover art by Barye Phillips.


Cover by Barye Phillips


From what I can tell, Phillips enjoyed a long and prolific career as an illustrator but I've yet to find any biographical information to share on the artist. (Except, of course, the part about him enjoying a long career as an illustrator.) However interested parties can peruse numerous other examples of illustrations penned during said career here.

(PS: And as always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, April 20, 2012

case of the vanishing beauty

Those of you who have been following along may recall we came to the end of our latest pile of thrifted pulp fiction as of our last entry; and those of you who have really been following along know this can only mean one thing...


Technically some of the books seen in the pic above were treated to a photoshoot with our unofficial official mascot, GG Allin Doll, some time ago (see here) but for whatever reason never made their way onto the blog. So I decided it was time the PFP take a stroll through Richard S. Prather's Shell Scott series - the ones we have copies of at least. Starting, appropriately enough, with the first novel to feature everyone's favorite hard boiled, wise cracking, blond headed private dick, Case Of The Vanishing Beauty.


Cover by Barye Phillips


PS: An alternate version of this cover can be seen here.

(And, as always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, April 13, 2012

the golden scorpion

Rounding out our survey of this stack of pulp fiction is The Golden Scorpion by Sax Rohmer.


Cover by J. Lombardero


Perhaps not the most memorable cover in the stack (no offense to Mr. or Mrs. Lombardero) but now that we've each read our way through the Fu Manchu series, we've got to branch out a little if we want to continue our survey of Rohmer's work.

(PS: As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

killer in white

Next up - and the next to last - in our survey of this stack of paperbacks is another flea market purchase circa the husband, Killer In White by Tedd Thomey.


I wasn't able to track down a ton of biographical information on Thomey, or a credit for the cover art, but interested parties can read a little about him (and check out an alternate Gold Medal cover) here.

(And, as always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

everybody slept here

As a contrast to our previous post - and because it's the next book in this stack of dusty paperbacks we've been slowly working our way through - tonight's entry is Everybody Slept Here by Elliot Arnold. A tale of life and love in wartime Washington; DC, not State.


Cover by James Avati


Not sure if the husband planned to read this one or not. If I had to guess I'd say he purchased it based on the cover and the fact it made an amusing compliment to our previous entry. (Both were found at the same flea market, I believe at the same table, sometime last Fall.)

On a semi-related topic, an alternate non-Avati cover can be seen here.

And, as always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.