Tuesday, November 29, 2011

lyrics of love

As mentioned in our previous post, I thought it would be fun to continue on with the "After Dark" series for a couple weeks. Although, I must admit, without a picture of a stack of books next to GG Allin Doll to use as a jumping off point I wasn't really sure where to start as far as pulling stuff off the shelves.

In the end I decided to group some things together by publisher; starting with an imprint that made it's PFP debut last week, Saber Tropic and the book that was on top of the pile when I had my lightbulb moment, Lyrics Of Love by Anthony French.



I wasn't able to track down a ton of info. on the imprint online, but you can read a little about their oeuvre via this page on the VintageSleaze site. And, thanks to a little extra time I had this afternoon and a book the husband gifted me a few years ago, Sin-A-Rama, I uncovered a little info on the artist I think may be responsible for the above cover, as well as the cover of Man In Demand, Bill Edwards.

"Bill Edwards painted sleaze covers for Sanford Aday's imprints Fabian, Saber and Vega. From the early '60s until the early '70s, Edwards accomplished over a hundred covers for Aday. He characteristically painted moles on women's faces and, strangely, often painted Band-Aids on butts. He did interior illustrations for '70s girlie magazines and was an accomplished western artist. Edwards, a New Jersey native, was also a rodeo star and film and TV actor He died in 1999 at the age of 81."

(PS: FYI, I elected not to take a picture of them posed next to GG Allin Doll because, much like their back covers, the spines of Saber books very samey.)

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, November 25, 2011

the sex rebels

Rounding out our survey of this stack of paperbacks, we have The Sex Rebels by Jerry Nolan. No, not that Jerry Nolan; plus it would appear, based on the title page, no one named Jerry or Nolan wrote this. That page credits the book to Gordon B. Strunk.



Not surprisingly, I wasn't able to find biographical info. on either author, nor a credit for the artist; which seems to be the norm with these adult paperbacks.

Speaking of which, I think we're going to continue with the "After Dark" theme for a little bit so tune in next week for more smut!

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

man in demand

As mentioned in our last post, the top two books in this pile of flea marketed paperbacks are of the adult variety - aka the section of our bookshelves I don't visit very often when looking for actual reading material but can't seem to resist bringing home with me when I stumble across them. (The husband likes to say I can find smut anywhere; I'd argue but, essentially, he's right. Although I tend to think smut finds me.)

In other words, tonight the Pulp Fiction Project "After Dark" series returns with Man In Demand by A.J. Davis.




As is often the case with these type of books, I was unable to find any information about the author (it's likely a pseudonym), or a credit for the cover art but I'll keep trying.

In the meantime, should you care to see this, or any of the other covers that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.

Friday, November 18, 2011

fast company

When consulting the photo of this stack of pulp fiction to see what tonight's subject would be I realized the book sitting on top of our previous subject was the subject of a previous two part post; which brings us to Fast Company by Marco Page, aka Philly's own Harry Kurnitz.

Another book I read on our recent vacation. (And, interestingly a murder mystery involving the scandalous world of rare book dealers.)


Cover by Leo Manso


After reading this I thought this one would probably make a good movie too; and, in this case, I'm not the only one who thought so. (See here.)

PS: The final two books in the aforementioned pile are of the "adult" variety. Meaning tune in next week for the return of The Pulp Fiction Project "After Dark".

(PPS: Larger versions of this or covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, November 11, 2011

so young, so cold, so fair

Tonight we continue working our way through this stack of paperbacks with the book that marks the halfway point: So Young, So Cold, So Fair by John Creasey. (AKA The Beauty Queen Killer, AKA A Beauty For Inspector West.)


Cover by Robert McGinnis (Interestingly, his first published cover.)


I'm new to Creasey's work in general (and the Inspector West character specifically) but I read this on our recent vacation and quite enjoyed it.

Actually, I think it would make a great movie. And I've already got two treatment ideas; one a straight up old school Noir flick, the other an Italian style Giallo. (Should any wealthy filmmakers reading this think either sounds like a good idea, you know where to find me.)

And should anyone else reading this care to see larger versions of this or covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

n or m?

Continuing our journey through this stack of pulp fiction, from the ground up (so to speak), tonight's PFP entry is N Or M? by Agatha Christie.


Cover illustration by William Teason


I haven't read this one yet but I'm looking forward to learning the significance of the binoculars, matches, onion and bloody hammer.

And since I can't use the words bloody and hammer in the same sentence without thinking of Roky Erickson...



(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, November 4, 2011

hell's angels

At the risk of succumbing to the typical "obligatory why I haven't been posting" post intro - sorry for my brief disappearance from this space. I was on vacation for a portion of the past two weeks. (And on a vacation from the internet for all of it ;)

Anywhoo, I'm back now and ready to revisit this stack of pulp fiction with tonight's entry, Hell's Angels by Hank Janson. Featuring a fabulous cover illustration by Robert Maguire.


(Interestingly, Hank Janson is both the name of the lead character, as well as a pseudonym.; both invented by British author Stephen Daniel Frances.)



Based on the bibliography on the page linked above I gather the "#6 in the series" part mentioned on the cover refers to the 17 Janson books published by Gold Star between 1963 - 65. I'm not sure which of the many authors associated with the series on the whole is responsible for this sub-series but based on the timeline it's not Frances.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)