Friday, April 29, 2011

blood on the stars

Jumping ahead a few years in the Mike Shayne / Brett Halliday series (but only one book in this pile) today's entry, Blood On The Stars, features yet another fabulous Bob McGinnis illustration.



An observation, not a complaint obviously. The Pulp Fiction Project loves a McGinnis illustration!

While we're still on the subject, I actually stumbled across scans of two other editions of this title - this one (also by McGinnis) and this mapback - whose covers are just as good.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, April 22, 2011

murder and the married virgin

Continuing our visual stroll through this pile of pulp fiction; tonight's entry is also the most recent Mike Shayne / Brett Halliday mystery I've read, Murder And The Married Virgin.


Cover illustration by McGinnis


Not surprisingly, like all of the other Shayne books I've read thus far, it was good!

PS: I like how Robert McGinnis' credits differ slightly from book to book in this Dell series.

(PPS: As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, April 15, 2011

heads you lose

This week we follow through with our promise to slowly work our way through this pile of Mike Shayne / Brett Halliday paperbacks with the follow up to last week's entry, literally and metaphorically, Heads You Lose.


Unlike the rest of the covers in this pile, all of which feature the artwork of Robert McGinnis on the cover, this one features a painting by another prolific artist of the era / genre, Robert Stanley. (Who made a previous PFP appearance, during our A.A. Is For August series, here.)


Although, honestly, had there been no credit on the back, I may have mistaken this for a McGinnis; their styles aren't exactly dissimilar.

(PS: You can read a little more about Stanley here.)

(PPS: As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, April 8, 2011

in a deadly vein

This week we continue working our way through this dusty pile of pulp fiction with In a Deadly Vein, aka Murder Wears A Mummer's Mask.


Cover illustration by Bob McGinnis


According to Wikipedia the seventh in the Mike Shayne / Brett Halliday series of novels and, according to the husband, a book that has nothing to do with the Mummers as we know them in my neck of the woods. (Since I haven't read it, and won't have time to for a while, we'll have to assume he's right.)

(PS: As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, April 1, 2011

dividend on death

This week we return to our "regular" PFP posts with Dividend On Death by Brett Halliday, the first in a long and storied series of stories featuring "the toughest red head ever" Mike Shayne.

I have to admit, although I previously read and enjoyed one Shayne / Halliday novel (this one), when the husband came home with this stack of dusty paperbacks I was mostly excited about all of the fantastic Bob McGinnis artwork. Which, as you will see over the next month or two, is completely understandable.


Cover painting by Bob McGinnis


I started slowly reading my way through the portion of the series seen in the photo above late last year though and I can definitely see why the character became so popular. I can't quite figure out why this particular novel was rejected by 21 publishers before seeing the light of day but, not being a publishing executive in the '20s or '30s, perhaps it's not for me to understand.

(PS: As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)