Friday, February 25, 2011

don't speak to strange girls

Although I knew we would get to this point eventually - and I've essentially been counting down to it for the past month - I must admit I'm a bit sad to finally reach the end of this pile of dusty pulp fiction. Fortunately, as promised in a previous post, I have a fun PFP project planned for March. Tune in Tuesday for more info.

In the meantime let's take a gander at today's entry, Don't Speak To Strange Girls by Harry Whittington.




Regular readers probably already know how fond I am of the collected and individual works of McGinnis but I have to admit, although this is the second week in a row we have a Whittington penned book as a subject, I don't know anything about the author.

Except what I learned last week via a comment on our previous cover from my flickr homie UK Vintage; which is, Harry employed a few pseudonyms over the course of his literary career. (Much like yours truly.) Among them Whit Harrison, Hallam Whitney, Ken Holland & Kathryn Harriet Myers.

(PS: I like how one of them is female. Interestingly I've never used a male pseudonym, possibly because my real name is gender non-specific already.)

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, February 18, 2011

desire in the dust

As I think I've mentioned one or twice before, the Pulp Fiction Project has cyber connected me with a bunch of other folks who also enjoy dusty paperbacks and their cover art. (As well as scanning and posting them to their photostream.) Which, in turn, has led to me joining a few paperback themed flickr groups, most of which cover specific sub-genres of the genre.

For example, the Movie Tie-In Paperbacks group. And of course I bring all of this up because today's subject, Desire In The Dust by Harry Whittington is both a book and a movie.


Cover by Barye Phillips


Unfortunately I couldn't find a trailer for this film but interested parties can read a bit about it here and here.

PS: If this type of thing interests you at all - and why would you still be reading this if it didn't - I highly recommend a browse through the MTI group. There are some fantastic covers in there! Like this one for one of my all time favorite ape movies, Konga. Since I did find a trailer for that...



So good! I'm debating suggesting a Saturday night double feature of this and Gorilla At Large to the husband.

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, February 11, 2011

one tear for my grave

Tonight's PFP entry brings us one step closer to the end of this stack of flea marketed paperbacks. In fact, there are only two books left to go. (PS: Not to fear, I've got something fun planned for March.) More on all of those subjects over the next consecutive Friday nights, obviously. For tonight we'll stick to One Tear For My Grave by Mike Roscoe.

I have to admit I know very little about the author. (Save what I learned from this page on the Thrilling Detective site prior to writing this entry; and the main thing I learned there is Mike Roscoe is actually a pair of detectives, Michael Ruso & John Roscoe, who wrote a series of books together.) I am familiar with the person responsible for the cover art though.




As mentioned in his Wikipedia entry Maguire was quite prolific, with over 600 covers to his credit; many of which you can see here and here. (And on at least one c14 7" cover. Although perhaps I shouldn't admit to that.)

And, as always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.

Friday, February 4, 2011

cry tough!

This week we continue the countdown to the end of this pile of pulp fiction with Cry Tough! by Irving Shulman. Who, as I learned in my brief web sleuthing (in addition to "The Amboy Dukes") wrote the screen adaptation of Rebel Without A Cause plus biographies of Jean Harlow and Rudolph Valentino.


(I was unsuccessful in my attempts to track down a credit for this cover but if I find one I will add it in.)


I have to admit, while I prefer he stick to buying books we actually want to read, the husband purchased this one strictly for the cover. But the art was so great I couldn't complain.

(PS: As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)