Friday, December 30, 2011

her soul went first

Seeing as how 2011 ends tomorrow, and I'll be otherwise occupied for the rest of the weekend, it's safe to say tonight's entry will be the last of the year; as well as the last entry in this series of "After Dark" covers featuring a series of Saber books culled from our shelf of "adult" paperbacks, Her Soul Went First by Jack Moore.




Whatever your plans are for New Year's, I hope you have a festive time!

(And, as always, larger versions of these, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Wednesday, December 28, 2011

the adulteress

Counting down to the end of 2011, as well as this series of "After Dark" entries, we have The Adulteress by Jack Moore, author of Brenda Caldwell.



Again, since there's no credit, I can't be sure who is responsible for either cover but stylistically I feel like they were done by different artists.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 23, 2011

moments of passion

Tonight's entry is Moments Of Passion by Drew Palmer; yet another in a series of Saber books for which I can't find info. on the author but one I'm feeling may venture back into "cover art possibly done by Bill Edwards" territory.




Merry Christmas to those who celebrate the holiday and happy weekend to everyone else!

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

lust has no bounds

Continuing with the general theme of our previous post - both in the sense that it's another entry in our "After Dark" series and another Saber book with the word lust in it's title - is tonight's entry, Lust Has No Bounds by Henry Martin.





Of course, it's also another book by an anonymous author with no cover art credit but you were probably expecting that by now.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 16, 2011

fraternity of lust

Tonight's entry is another in a series of Saber books for which I can't find a cover credit (nor info. on the author) Fraternity Of Lust by Wilton Grady.




I also have no idea what may have made that indent on the back cover but must admit, it amuses me.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

blind date

Tonight the impromptu return of the PFP "After Dark" series continues with Blind Date by Ralph Brandon. (Another Saber book culled from our shelf of adult paperbacks; as well as another cover I'm feeling wasn't done by Bill Edwards.)




Although I do like the cover - particularly the fill in the title - I have to admit, I love the fact the female lead character's name is Bunny.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 9, 2011

bachelor husband

Tonight's entry, Bachelor Husband by Lee Walters, is another in the series of Saber books found on our shelf of "adult" paperbacks; as well as another in a series of fantastic covers I have no factual credit for.




Although, unlike the previous entries, I'm feeling less certain this one was done by Bill Edwards.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Wednesday, December 7, 2011

brenda caldwell

This week our "After Dark" series continues with a survey of a short stack of Saber books not containing an extra word in the logo, starting off with a novel boasting a particularly fetching cover, but not particularly creative title, Brenda Caldwell by Jack Moore.




Again, since there is no credit, I'm not a hundred percent sure this cover was done by Bill Edwards but, based on the similarities to the three previous Saber Tropic entries, I am pretty sure they were all done by the same artist.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 2, 2011

love? thank you!

Tonight's entry, Love? Thank You! by Sharon L. Thompson is the third and final Saber Tropic book on our shelf of "adult" pulp fiction; also the third, but possibly not final, book to be featured here with a cover I think was done by Bill Edwards.




Tune in next week for more Saber, sans Tropic, smut.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

lyrics of love

As mentioned in our previous post, I thought it would be fun to continue on with the "After Dark" series for a couple weeks. Although, I must admit, without a picture of a stack of books next to GG Allin Doll to use as a jumping off point I wasn't really sure where to start as far as pulling stuff off the shelves.

In the end I decided to group some things together by publisher; starting with an imprint that made it's PFP debut last week, Saber Tropic and the book that was on top of the pile when I had my lightbulb moment, Lyrics Of Love by Anthony French.



I wasn't able to track down a ton of info. on the imprint online, but you can read a little about their oeuvre via this page on the VintageSleaze site. And, thanks to a little extra time I had this afternoon and a book the husband gifted me a few years ago, Sin-A-Rama, I uncovered a little info on the artist I think may be responsible for the above cover, as well as the cover of Man In Demand, Bill Edwards.

"Bill Edwards painted sleaze covers for Sanford Aday's imprints Fabian, Saber and Vega. From the early '60s until the early '70s, Edwards accomplished over a hundred covers for Aday. He characteristically painted moles on women's faces and, strangely, often painted Band-Aids on butts. He did interior illustrations for '70s girlie magazines and was an accomplished western artist. Edwards, a New Jersey native, was also a rodeo star and film and TV actor He died in 1999 at the age of 81."

(PS: FYI, I elected not to take a picture of them posed next to GG Allin Doll because, much like their back covers, the spines of Saber books very samey.)

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, November 25, 2011

the sex rebels

Rounding out our survey of this stack of paperbacks, we have The Sex Rebels by Jerry Nolan. No, not that Jerry Nolan; plus it would appear, based on the title page, no one named Jerry or Nolan wrote this. That page credits the book to Gordon B. Strunk.



Not surprisingly, I wasn't able to find biographical info. on either author, nor a credit for the artist; which seems to be the norm with these adult paperbacks.

Speaking of which, I think we're going to continue with the "After Dark" theme for a little bit so tune in next week for more smut!

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

man in demand

As mentioned in our last post, the top two books in this pile of flea marketed paperbacks are of the adult variety - aka the section of our bookshelves I don't visit very often when looking for actual reading material but can't seem to resist bringing home with me when I stumble across them. (The husband likes to say I can find smut anywhere; I'd argue but, essentially, he's right. Although I tend to think smut finds me.)

In other words, tonight the Pulp Fiction Project "After Dark" series returns with Man In Demand by A.J. Davis.




As is often the case with these type of books, I was unable to find any information about the author (it's likely a pseudonym), or a credit for the cover art but I'll keep trying.

In the meantime, should you care to see this, or any of the other covers that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.

Friday, November 18, 2011

fast company

When consulting the photo of this stack of pulp fiction to see what tonight's subject would be I realized the book sitting on top of our previous subject was the subject of a previous two part post; which brings us to Fast Company by Marco Page, aka Philly's own Harry Kurnitz.

Another book I read on our recent vacation. (And, interestingly a murder mystery involving the scandalous world of rare book dealers.)


Cover by Leo Manso


After reading this I thought this one would probably make a good movie too; and, in this case, I'm not the only one who thought so. (See here.)

PS: The final two books in the aforementioned pile are of the "adult" variety. Meaning tune in next week for the return of The Pulp Fiction Project "After Dark".

(PPS: Larger versions of this or covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, November 11, 2011

so young, so cold, so fair

Tonight we continue working our way through this stack of paperbacks with the book that marks the halfway point: So Young, So Cold, So Fair by John Creasey. (AKA The Beauty Queen Killer, AKA A Beauty For Inspector West.)


Cover by Robert McGinnis (Interestingly, his first published cover.)


I'm new to Creasey's work in general (and the Inspector West character specifically) but I read this on our recent vacation and quite enjoyed it.

Actually, I think it would make a great movie. And I've already got two treatment ideas; one a straight up old school Noir flick, the other an Italian style Giallo. (Should any wealthy filmmakers reading this think either sounds like a good idea, you know where to find me.)

And should anyone else reading this care to see larger versions of this or covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

n or m?

Continuing our journey through this stack of pulp fiction, from the ground up (so to speak), tonight's PFP entry is N Or M? by Agatha Christie.


Cover illustration by William Teason


I haven't read this one yet but I'm looking forward to learning the significance of the binoculars, matches, onion and bloody hammer.

And since I can't use the words bloody and hammer in the same sentence without thinking of Roky Erickson...



(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, November 4, 2011

hell's angels

At the risk of succumbing to the typical "obligatory why I haven't been posting" post intro - sorry for my brief disappearance from this space. I was on vacation for a portion of the past two weeks. (And on a vacation from the internet for all of it ;)

Anywhoo, I'm back now and ready to revisit this stack of pulp fiction with tonight's entry, Hell's Angels by Hank Janson. Featuring a fabulous cover illustration by Robert Maguire.


(Interestingly, Hank Janson is both the name of the lead character, as well as a pseudonym.; both invented by British author Stephen Daniel Frances.)



Based on the bibliography on the page linked above I gather the "#6 in the series" part mentioned on the cover refers to the 17 Janson books published by Gold Star between 1963 - 65. I'm not sure which of the many authors associated with the series on the whole is responsible for this sub-series but based on the timeline it's not Frances.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, October 21, 2011

on the run

Seeing as how we reached the end of this stack of paperbacks with our last entry, we now turn our attentions to the stack of dusty pulp fiction most recently photographed next to GG Allin Doll, aka the books we flea marketed during our visit to the Catskill mountains last month.

Technically only half of these were purchased at the flea market. The other half were purchased at a literal barn full of used books we happened across in our travels that weekend. (I wish I could remember the name of the road it was on but let's just say, should you find yourself driving on a winding farm laden road in upstate NY and come across a large barn with a hand written sign outside reading "all books $1.00," I recommend you pull over.)

Anywhoo, for a change I thought we'd start at the bottom; meaning tonight's entry is On The Run by John MacDonald.




(Again I elected to skip the Nick Carter book. No offense to anyone involved; I'm just not as into the series as the husband is.)

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

orgy of the dead

Generally speaking, press releases about art exhibits aren't really appropriate Pulp Fiction Project (re)post fodder; unless, of course, the exhibit in question features a collection of sleaze paperbacks written by Ed Wood. Which this one does. Check it out:

Ed Wood's Sleaze Paperbacks Curated By Michael Daley And Johan Kugelberg

The antiquarian mystique surrounding Edward Davis Wood Jr.’s career as an author of pornographic pulp fiction is legend. He wrote under a variety of pseudonyms, books were published and re-published under different titles, and occasionally under different author names. Multiple authors would share the same pseudonym, and the companies that published the titles weren’t the kind of operations that kept any kind of records, nor paid royalties, nor really existed in the manner that most are to expect of book publishers.

The paperbacks are truly rare, even in an age of mass-searchable used book engines, and google ferocity. Ed Wood’s sleaze fiction is also as strange, idiosyncratic and out of step with his times and mores as his infamous movies. Wood would write porn inter-spliced with lengthy philosophical, sociological and psychological discourse, he’d write first person narratives of life as a transvestite in the buttoned up America of the 1950’s. He’d riff on psychosexual themes, and unleash his id, his ego and his superego in turn, sometimes in the same chapter. He’d write about sex and the human condition without veneer or filters, offering up the damaged and anguished voice of a desperately soul-searching drunk with a sense of self-worth that would stand in dichotomy to his self-pity.


Cover by Robert Bonfils


His descent into alcoholism and poverty was mirrored by the publishers that employed him. Towards the end of his life he wrote pornography with decreasing amounts of the strange flourishes of his eccentric personality. He died in 1978 of an alcohol-induced heart attack. His friends say the porn killed him. For further information see Rudolph Grey’s masterful biography Nightmare of Ecstasy.

This is the largest assembly of Ed Wood publications exhibited to date. Boo-Hooray has tracked down roughly seventy of his books and publications. Some collectors claim that he wrote dozens more. Entrepreneurial book dealers often indulge in Ed Wood pseudonym speculation. A ten dollar paperback can thus become an antiquarian rarity, even with flimsy or non-existent evidence. A handful of these are in the show.

The collection has been sold to the Cornell University rare book library where it will become a part of their human sexuality archive.

So cool! The collection will be on display at Boo-Hooray Gallery in NYC November 2nd - December 1st. An illustrated and annotated exhibition catalogue will be available in deluxe and regular editions; visit www.boo-hooray.com for more info.

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

mark of murder

Tonight we top off our survey of this stack of pulp fiction with the book at the bottom, Mark Of Murder by Dell Shannon.


Cover by Jack Thurston


As is my way, I did a little web sleuthing about the author and artist prior to writing this post and, while I didn't find out anything about the latter, I did learn Dell Shannon is not a real person.

Or rather, he is if you're talking about Del Shannon. Dell Shannon on the other hand is a pseudonym; one of a few employed by author Elizabeth Linington over the course of her career.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

armchair in hell

Unlike the rest of the books in this pile, I've read tonight's entry Armchair In Hell by Henry Kane. My first Pete Chambers mystery; and my last, until we come across another one. When we do, I hope it has a cover as good as this one.


Cover by Gerald Gregg



Via my thorough research - read: the flickr search I did after I learned the artist's name - I also learned Gregg is responsible for another one of my favorite covers (this one) as well as tons of great pulp fiction paperback art in general.

(Seriously! Check out some of his work here.)

(PS: And as always, should you care to check out larger versions of these, or covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, you can do so here.)

Friday, October 7, 2011

the case of the moth eaten mink

Tonight we continue working our way through this pile of pulp fiction, from top to bottom, with The Case Of The Moth Eaten Mink by Erle Stanley Gardner. A name very familiar to the Pulp Fiction Project; particularly when he's not using his own name. (Meaning, of course, books credited to A. A. Fair, aka the subject of many previous posts.)


Cover photograph by Silver Studios


I've worked my way through a good chunk of the Cool / Lam series thus far and enjoyed them all so on our last vacation I decided to try one featuring his "other" famous fictional lawyer / detective, Perry Mason. Not surprisingly I enjoyed that too.

It wasn't this book, it was The Case Of The Negligent Nymph, but I'll probably bring this one on our next vacation.

PS: I haven't had time to check this out yet but apparently the episode of the Perry Mason TV show, starring Raymond Burr, based on this novel can be seen here.

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Tuesday, October 4, 2011

i prefer murder

While tonight's entry, I Prefer Murder by Browning Norton & Charles A. Landolf, is certainly worthy of a long informative post, unfortunately I can't write one. I haven't read it yet and was unsuccessful in my efforts to find info. on either author, the cover artist or the publisher. Curious, no?


Cover by Saul Levine


I think yes. Should I uncover anything I will add it in but in the meantime we can just gaze upon it's beauty.

Friday, September 30, 2011

a gentle murderer

Continuing the effort to work our way through this pile of pulp fiction, from top to bottom, tonight's entry is A Gentle Murderer by Dorothy Salisbury Davis.



(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, September 23, 2011

easy to kill

At the risk of repeating a portion of this post on my "other" blog, this past weekend the Kommandant treated me to a rare weekend getaway; during which we, not so surprisingly, engaged in activities we partake in fairly often: flea marketing, farmers marketing, trespassing and taking pictures.

Of course, only the first and last of those things are relevant here. Meaning, while at the flea market we found some paperbacks and when we got home I took a picture of them next to the official JP / PFP mascot, GG Allin Doll. As is my way.


At which point I realized the fourth book in the above stack has the same title as tonight's intended topic, aka the second in this stack of pulp fiction we flea marketed over the Spring. Ooops!

On the bright side they both have very different but equally cool covers so, thanks to the prolific pen of Agatha Christie, tonight we have two covers for the price of one. (Technically, since access to this blog and / or my flickr account is free, I suppose it's two for the price of none but you get the idea.)





Cover by Hawes


Thus far the closest I've come to Ms. Christie's work is watching a few episodes of Poirot on PBS with the husband (and mostly what I remember is David Suchet's outrageous mustache) but I will likely bring one of these on my next vacation.

PS: In an interesting twist of fate, not only does this post have two covers, this novel has been published under two titles: Easy To Kill and Murder Is Easy and has been made into two TV movies.

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)