Friday, December 31, 2010

champagne for one

In honor of the events of the day (or, uh... night) I've decided to veer away from the pile we've been slowly working our way through to share a little New Year's Eve Pulp Fiction Project bubbly with you all via today's entry, Champagne For One by Rex Stout.


Cover illustration by John L. Baker


And on that note I am off to prepare for a celebratory evening of, among other things, champagne for two with the Kommandant.

Whatever you have planned, cheers to a festive evening and fabulous 2011!

(PS: As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 24, 2010

the book of the dead

As I was unsuccessful in my efforts to find something Christmas themed or otherwise appropriate for today's PFP entry, we'll just continue working our way through this pile with Elizabeth Daly's The Book Of The Dead.


Illustrated by Ed Grant


I'm not sure if this is something I've missed in previous Bantam books featured here or if this is unique to a certain series / time period of their paperbacks but this particular book has an "about the cover" blurb featured on the page before the title page.

(The frontispiece? I'm not sure if, by definition, a page across from the title page has to contain an illustration to be considered a frontispiece but that is probably a topic for someone else's blog.)

Anywhoo, I took the liberty of keying it in for your reading enjoyment.

"He had his foot on the first step when he noticed that the front door was partly open... and a hat with a pink rose on it was lying half way down the front steps. He ran up to the vestibule. She lay face downwards, half in and half out the doorway, her packages scattered about her, her handbag open and empty in a dark corner.

Gammadge bent over her, sickened by shock and remorse. He touched her hand in it's fabric glove; still warm, but there could be no life in anyone whose skull was crunched like that..."


PS: That dame looks pretty fetching for a bloodless corpse with a crunched skull.

PPS: Thanks to Ed for not showing the crunched skull.

(PPPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 17, 2010

the darker the night

Continuing on our journey to the end of this stack of dusty paperbacks, this week's entry is The Darker The Night by Herbert Brean.


Front cover illustration by Wayne Blickenstaff


According to the inside, the second in a series of "exciting adventures" featuring a detective named Reynold Frame; and the back cover a story about a writer who had sworn off detecting until "the combination of murder and hypnotism set him on a violent trail of a mad killer who was out to claim his third victim."

I have to admit I haven't read it yet but all that sounds good to me.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 10, 2010

the sleeper

As promised in last week's PFP post here's the second (and, as far as I know, last) book featuring a cover painting by Lou Marchetti culled from this stack of dusty paperbacks, The Sleeper by Holly Roth.



Speaking of said stack, as of this post we are just about half way through; not to worry though, when we finish we'll just start working our way through this one.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 3, 2010

the devil threw dice

This week's entry in the pulp fiction project is The Devil Threw Dice by Amber Dean; featuring a fabulous cover painting by Lou Marchetti.

A story I haven't read yet about "the kind of gal that many men might kill." (And, according to what we can glean from the back cover, the kind of gal one man did.)



PS: Am I the only one who thinks the author's name sound like the type of pseudonym one would adopt for a career in porn?

Anywhoo, this is the first PFP appearance by either the author or artist, but it won't be the last for the latter. There's another Marchetti cover in the pile we've been working our way through so tune in for that next week.

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)