Friday, December 31, 2010

champagne for one

In honor of the events of the day (or, uh... night) I've decided to veer away from the pile we've been slowly working our way through to share a little New Year's Eve Pulp Fiction Project bubbly with you all via today's entry, Champagne For One by Rex Stout.


Cover illustration by John L. Baker


And on that note I am off to prepare for a celebratory evening of, among other things, champagne for two with the Kommandant.

Whatever you have planned, cheers to a festive evening and fabulous 2011!

(PS: As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 24, 2010

the book of the dead

As I was unsuccessful in my efforts to find something Christmas themed or otherwise appropriate for today's PFP entry, we'll just continue working our way through this pile with Elizabeth Daly's The Book Of The Dead.


Illustrated by Ed Grant


I'm not sure if this is something I've missed in previous Bantam books featured here or if this is unique to a certain series / time period of their paperbacks but this particular book has an "about the cover" blurb featured on the page before the title page.

(The frontispiece? I'm not sure if, by definition, a page across from the title page has to contain an illustration to be considered a frontispiece but that is probably a topic for someone else's blog.)

Anywhoo, I took the liberty of keying it in for your reading enjoyment.

"He had his foot on the first step when he noticed that the front door was partly open... and a hat with a pink rose on it was lying half way down the front steps. He ran up to the vestibule. She lay face downwards, half in and half out the doorway, her packages scattered about her, her handbag open and empty in a dark corner.

Gammadge bent over her, sickened by shock and remorse. He touched her hand in it's fabric glove; still warm, but there could be no life in anyone whose skull was crunched like that..."


PS: That dame looks pretty fetching for a bloodless corpse with a crunched skull.

PPS: Thanks to Ed for not showing the crunched skull.

(PPPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 17, 2010

the darker the night

Continuing on our journey to the end of this stack of dusty paperbacks, this week's entry is The Darker The Night by Herbert Brean.


Front cover illustration by Wayne Blickenstaff


According to the inside, the second in a series of "exciting adventures" featuring a detective named Reynold Frame; and the back cover a story about a writer who had sworn off detecting until "the combination of murder and hypnotism set him on a violent trail of a mad killer who was out to claim his third victim."

I have to admit I haven't read it yet but all that sounds good to me.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 10, 2010

the sleeper

As promised in last week's PFP post here's the second (and, as far as I know, last) book featuring a cover painting by Lou Marchetti culled from this stack of dusty paperbacks, The Sleeper by Holly Roth.



Speaking of said stack, as of this post we are just about half way through; not to worry though, when we finish we'll just start working our way through this one.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, December 3, 2010

the devil threw dice

This week's entry in the pulp fiction project is The Devil Threw Dice by Amber Dean; featuring a fabulous cover painting by Lou Marchetti.

A story I haven't read yet about "the kind of gal that many men might kill." (And, according to what we can glean from the back cover, the kind of gal one man did.)



PS: Am I the only one who thinks the author's name sound like the type of pseudonym one would adopt for a career in porn?

Anywhoo, this is the first PFP appearance by either the author or artist, but it won't be the last for the latter. There's another Marchetti cover in the pile we've been working our way through so tune in for that next week.

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, November 26, 2010

all over but the shooting

This week we continue working our way towards the end of this stack of pulp fiction with All Over But The Shooting by Richard Powell; number #2 in the series of Arab and Andy Blake mysteries?

(I wasn't a hundred percent clear on that but it is the second entry in the list of novels on his Wikipedia page. Either way, after I read it, it will be my first Arab and Andy Blake Mystery.)



I can't quite make out the signature so I'm also not sure who was responsible for this cover art but, from what I've learned, one or more of the following artists - Sol Immerman, Lawrence Hoffman, Robert Holly - were responsible for the first 105 Popular Library parerback covers, and at #92 this would qualify.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, November 19, 2010

she faded into air

This week we continue working our way through this stack of pulp fiction with another random sampling, She Faded Into Air by Ethel Lina White.



I wasn't able to find any info on the cover artist (if someone passes the info. to me elsewhere I'll add it in here) but it reminds me a bit of the first random sampling posted from the previously linked pile, The Case Is Closed.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, November 12, 2010

death turns the tables

This week the Pulp Fiction Project turns the tables on John Dickson Carr's Death Turns The Tables.



I assume, to paraphrase Ralph Wiggum, the cat and mouse theme featured in the front cover illustration represents obviousness; I have no clue what the curious pose of the tiger might represent.

(Aside from... uh... the obvious. Which makes the illustration even more curious.)

As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.

Friday, October 29, 2010

some women won't wait

At the risk of starting this post off on an unrelated topic (not like I've ever let that stop me before) did you know on this very date - many, many, many years ago (one many for every five year span) - the Kommandant and I were wedded in unholy bliss?

It is true. Of course this personal trivial fact has nothing to do with the blog in general, nor the Pulp Fiction Project specifically, but today's selection does represent two things we've both become quite enamored with over the past year or so - Cool / Lam mysteries and the collected works of Robert McGinnis.



This is actually the second copy of Some Women Won't Wait by Erle Stanley Gardner, writing under the name of A.A. Fair, we've come across; the first, the subject of this previous PFP post. The jury is still out on whether or not we'll keep both but, based on how much I like both covers, I'm leaning towards yes.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, October 22, 2010

the cross-eyed bear murders

This week's entry, The Cross-Eyed Bear Murders by Dorothy B. Hughes, was also chosen by the Kommandant; although, unlike our last two week's PFP posts, not for any particular reason. I think he just likes Dell mapbacks. (Can't really say I blame him on that.)



I also can't really say I would have picked this up myself (I tend to get distracted by jazzier covers first) but since it wound up in the stack, and the title pages look promising, I will likely read it.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, October 15, 2010

deadlock

Following up last week's post we have the previously mentioned tie for the husband's favorite covers out of this stack of recently acquired titles, Deadlock by Ruth Fenisong.


Cover painting by John McDermott


And on that note I'm about to sign off a la last week's post and spend what's left of this Friday night the same way I spent what was left of last Friday night, enjoying adult beverages and British horror movies (see here) with the husband. (Except this week it's Mummy night!)

Have a great weekend!

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, October 8, 2010

what a body!

This week's PFP entry comes to us in the form of What A Body! by Alan Green; according to the title page, "winner of the 1949 Mystery Writers Of America award for the best first mystery by any author."

(And, according to the Kommandant, one of his favorite covers out of this stack of recently acquired titles; last I checked it was tied with Deadlock. Maybe we'll do that next week.)


Cover painting by Gilbert Darling. The back cover is uncredited but I would like to point out it is, to date, the only cover featured in the Pulp Fiction Project - front or back - featuring a book to woman comparison test chart.


And on that note I'm off to spend what's left of my Friday night enjoying adult beverages and British horror movies (see here) with the husband.

Have a great weekend!

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, October 1, 2010

the case is closed

Earlier in the week I mentioned the newest additions to our already slightly overstuffed shelf of dusty pulp fiction paperbacks; any and all of which would make fine additions to the Pulp Fiction Project series. (And, eventually, I'm sure they all will.)

I must admit, when it came time to decide what to scan in first I truly could not make up my mind. (As sometimes happens when I'm overwhelmed with inspiration.) Fortunately inspiration found me, before I had to search for it, via a comment left in the PFP photostream on the first of the three book related photos in that post.

So, thanks to a request from a fellow vintage paperback enthusiast, we'll open with The Case Is Closed by Patricia Wentworth.


(Artist unknown, at least to me; I think part of the reason he wanted to see the cover was to determine who did the cover art so if I find out I will add it in here.)

[ETA: Cover art by Im-Ho "Im-ho stands for a combination of two artists Sol Immerman and Lawrence Hoffman. And sometimes for Sol Immerman and Robert Holly. These three artists where responsible for the first 105 paperback covers for Popular Library." Thanks to UK Vintage for the info.]


(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, September 24, 2010

the innocent one

I have to admit, in my haste to get started adding Fall friendly fabulosity to the boutique I completely forgot to scan a cover for this week's PFP entry!

Fortunately my Virgo / Girl Scout-esque tendency to always be prepared meant I had something on hand to remedy this situation: the previously scanned but never posted original version of the artwork currently gracing the sidebar on behalf of the Pulp Fiction Project, The Innocent One by James Reach.



A "really believable study of a sex murderer" according to the Albuquerque Tribune. Since I haven't read the book and still have a stack of A.A Fair novels to get caught up on, for now we'll have to take their word for it.

(As always larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, September 3, 2010

night school

While some previous PFP subjects were purchased just as much for their content as their covers (for example, every book featured during the month of August), today's subject would not be one of them.

Truthfully I picked up this copy of Night School by R.V. Cassill solely because of the awesome Bob McGinnis cover art.



(I'm hoping, now that he's worked his way into my consciousness, I'll start seeing his work all over the place; kind of like what happened after I watched Yo Gabba Gabba with my niece one afternoon. BTW, did you know Mark Mothersbaugh is teaching your children to draw? And Biz Markie is teaching your children to beat box? Awesome!!)

One pop culture phenomenon that still hasn't fully worked it's way into my consciousness yet (meaning I haven't seen an episode) is Mad Men but, in my head, the show looks pretty much just like this painting.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Monday, August 30, 2010

try anything once

(aka A.A. Is For August #13)

Rounding out our month long A.A. Is For August series we have the twenty third in the series of A.A. Fair / Erle Stanley Gardner penned Cool / Lam mysteries, Try Anything Once.



An appropriate sentiment on which to end this first ever Pulp Fiction Project sub-project.

In retrospect, I enjoyed doing this so much I would try it twice but, until the husband finds another stack of paperbacks with a connecting thread and great covers en masse, we'll stick to our regular once a week Friday posting.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, August 27, 2010

bachelors get lonely

(aka A.A. Is For August #12)

Just a quick programming note: Our month long journey through the covers of this stack of paperbacks will come to an end on Monday. Meaning, as of next Friday, we'll be back to our regular once a week Pulp Fiction Project posts. (Which, for those who are new to this whole thing, are usually posted on Fridays.) I have some other programming notes to share but, in an effort to stay on topic, we'll save those for a future post.

Anywhoo, moving on to our intended subject we have lucky number twenty-one in the Cool / Lam series, Bachelors Get Lonely. A title that, unlike our previous entry, makes total sense to me. I would imagine bachelors do get lonely, at least some of the time. I mean, why else would they want to become husbands?



Although some would argue, based on the items depicted on the front cover, the bachelor in question is neither alone nor lonely. Because you're never alone with discarded undergarments, rumpled sheets & a Smith and Wesson, baby.

(Disclaimer: I have no idea what kind of gun that is, I just love Radio Birdman.)

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Wednesday, August 25, 2010

kept women can't quit

(aka A.A. Is For August #11)

Leaping ahead to number twenty in the Cool / Lam, Fair / Gardner series we have Kept Women Can't Quit; a title as memorable as it is confusing.

(Seriously, what does that mean?)



I admit, the Pocket Book covers are not quite as memorable as some of the previously blogged Dell offerings - again, it's hard to compete with a Robert McGinnis pin-up girl or artfully rendered map back - but I like the color scheme and painterly quality of this artwork.

(Assuming painterly is a word. And I assume it is because spell check told me I spelled it correctly.)

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Monday, August 23, 2010

beware the curves

(aka A.A. Is For August #10)

Today our 13 episode A.A. Is For August mini-series reaches double digits with the fifteenth Cool / Lam Fair / Gardner book, Beware The Curves; the successor to our previous entry not only in order of original publication but in terms of cover art.


Cover painting by Harry Bennett


Or maybe I'm the only one who thinks the illustration of the blond above is reminiscent of the silhouetted woman on the front and back cover of our copy of Some Women Won't Wait.

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, August 20, 2010

some women won't wait

(aka A.A. Is For August #9)

Continuing in our month long survey of the stack of vintage paperbacks that recently followed the husband home from the internet, today's subject, Some Women Won't Wait, is the fourteenth in the Cool / Lam series and features a cover painting by Griffith Foxley.



Who - in a six degrees of Kevin Bacon sort of way - is also responsible for the sole pre-A.A Is For August Fair / Gardner PFP entry, Top Of The Heap; which just so happens to be the lucky 13th book in the series; placing it right in between this and our previous entry. And PS: Kevin Bacon is from Philly, and so am I. Kooky huh?

Anywhoo, as much as I appreciate the front cover - and I do - I really love the design of the back. (What can I say, I enjoy a good layered transparent image in various sizes and colors. As anyone who's seen our old c14 business cards and / or assorted show posters I've designed over the years will attest.)

I also love the fact Gardner's first name is misspelled in one of the quotes.

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

bedrooms have windows

(aka A.A. Is For August #8)

Literally and metaphorically following up Monday's Fools Die On Friday double feature we have the twelfth in the series of A.A. Fair / Erle Stanley Gardner Cool / Lam books, Bedrooms Have Windows.



Perhaps the least "jazzy" of the covers featured in this series; on the other hand it's hard for a blurry poorly lit photo to compete with a Robert McGinnis pin-up girl or multi-layered map back.

(It's certainly not what I would consider "bad design," I just think it would have been better suited to a movie poster. Possibly for some sort of black and white Italian horror flick, possibly starring Barbara Steele.)

As always, larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.

Monday, August 16, 2010

fools die on friday

(aka A.A. Is For August #7)

Continuing our survey of the dusty A.A. Fair / Erle Stanley Gardner paperbacks the husband recently gifted himself (and in some ways, this blog) we have the singular instance of a double in the stack, Fools Die On Friday.

(The eleventh in the Cool / Lam series, for those who are playing along.)

Normally I would try to convince him to only keep one but in this instance even I couldn't decide, as one features yet another fantastic Bob McGinnis painting (although not a particularly memorable back cover):



While the other has memorable front and back covers.


Cover by Robert Stanley


(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Friday, August 13, 2010

give 'em the ax

(aka A.A. Is For August #6)

Happy Friday the 13th everybody!

This blog post has absolutely nothing to do with the day / date combination, nor the movie franchise with the same name, I just like Friday the 13th (the date and the movie franchise; for more on the latter subject see here) so I thought I'd mention it.

Moving on to a more relevant topic, we have today's PFP entry; aka the sixth entry in the A.A. Is For August series; aka the ninth entry in the Cool Lam series Give 'Em The Ax.



Also known as the Kommandant's favorite cover out of the stack of dusty paperbacks that inspired this series.

I'd elaborate but I've got to get back to working on tonight's shop update. Plus I don't really have anything to add - not even a cover credit.

(PS: Why is it so hard to find credit for these mapback books?)

(PPS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

owls don't blink

(aka A.A. Is For August #5)

I think I mentioned previously our run of numerical matching would end around book / entry #6 but, actually, the first gap in the stack of dusty paperbacks that inspired this series occurred at #5.

And of course the previous statement was made in the past tense on purpose, as the husband stumbled across a copy of the fifth Fair / Gardner Cool / Lam novel, Double Or Quits, in our thrifting travels this past weekend. (Oh that husband!)

At first I was going to save it for a later date, in an effort to stick with the original game plan, but since we were just talking about Robert McGinnis last week I figured I'd add it in.


Cover painting by Robert McGinnis


Speaking of sticking with the original plan, here is it's successor, aka the original subject of this post, Owls Don't Blink.


Possibly one of the greatest pulp fiction covers ever! (Although I may be a bit prejudice, I have an owl "thing.")

(PS: Larger versions, as well as covers of books that have found their way on to the blog previously, can be seen in the Pulp Fiction Project set in my Flickr photostream, here.)